Navigating the COVID-19 pandemic together.

Monticello Motor Club is, once again, open to Members and guests.

The Club is committed to protecting the health of our Members, guests, and staff. Like many others, we will are taking precautionary measures as recommended by the CDC and local governments before, during, and after all of our Members and guest experiences.

  • The temperature of all staff, members and guests will be taken prior to entry into the Club.
  • All staff, members and guests will be required to wear a mask when unable to maintain a social distance of at least 6′.
  • After each use, vehicles are given a steam treatment to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria in a safe, eco-friendly manner.
  • Vehicles will be delivered to our guests fully sanitized with the steering wheel and shifter wrapped in plastic for the driver to remove upon arrival.
  • All equipment is laundered and sanitized before each use.

We are fortunate that motorsports is uniquely geared for this health crisis. Unlike other sports, our typical on-track uniforms boast full coverage of nasal passages (balaclavas), protective shields (full-faced helmets), and skin protection (head-to-toe Nomex gear). Without passengers, we self-quarantine whenever we drive on track, while engaging in critical exercise and stress relief – something we all need during this historic time.

Let MMC be an escape where you can enjoy life in a safer, controlled environment.  We look forward to welcoming you to the property.

Acknowledge / Close Popup
July 17, 2019

This Hot-Rodded Ferrari Is All About Bringing Joy

Jeff Segal brought a racing driver’s tuning sensibility to his 1999 Ferrari F355 Modificata project car.

Hot rodding a Ferrari is like planning the space program. Even if you found the smartest people and wrote massive checks, you could still end up flat broke and spinning in an infinite void. Anyone who’d take on such an ambitious project would be advised to understand the intricacies of Ferrari tuning under the urgency of an endurance race. Someone like, say, a racing driver.

This modified F355 belongs to Jeff Segal, who at age 17 was the youngest race winner in the history of the Ferrari Challenge series, and who went on to achieve class wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans and Rolex 24 at Daytona. Segal spent a large portion of his racing career handling Ferrari-built kit on racing circuits, and teaching others to do the same. When it came time to do his own F355 project…continue reading.